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April 23, 2009

Home Storage OpenSolaris based Server (Install Fedora 9 & Benchmarks)

Filed under: opensolaris, storage, virtualbox, Virtualization, vmware — natiku @ 5:56 am

Install Fedora 9 x64-86 from DVD and do disk Benchmarks

This entry is part of HW for Virtualization


Start Fedora 9 x64-86 DVD in GUI mode:

Create partitioning scheme

On first 160GB disk sda I create this layout

Primary 24GB OpenSolaris None None (Now it have id for Linux 83 )
Primary 20GB Fedora 9 ext3 / Will install grub there
Primary 4GB SWAP Swap Swap For Fedora 9 OS
Primary Rest Linux ext3 /data 100GB mounted under /data

On rest 3x 500GB drives I create software RAD5 with ext3 and mount in /raid so we can measure drive speeds under Fedora 9.

Install Fedora 9

Process normal install into partition sda2 as Fedora 9 “/”, sda4 ex3 I mount as /data and on 3x 500GB drives I create software RAD5 with ext3 and mount in /raid.

Reboot into Fedora 9

  1. Post configure system on first run: Firewall, selinux and user creation.
  1. Update system (if you have network connection) with :
yum update

Test system HW

Test RAID5 Ext3 on S-ata II speed

http://www.linux.com/feature/142673

I will test with bonnie++ and IOzone tools

  1. Install ATrpms repositoy
cat <<EOF >/etc/yum.repos.d/artpms.repo
[atrpms]
name=Fedora Core \$releasever - \$basearch - ATrpms
baseurl=http://dl.atrpms.net/f\$releasever-\$basearch/atrpms/stable
gpgkey=http://ATrpms.net/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms
gpgcheck=1
EOF
  1. Search for bonnie++ Disk testing tools
yum -v search bonnie++
Reading Local RPMDB
bonnie++.x86_64 : Benchmark suite for hard drive and file system performance
Matched from:
bonnie++
Bonnie++ is a benchmark suite that is aimed at performing a number of
simple tests of hard drive and file system performance. Then you can
decide which test is important and decide how to compare different
systems after running it. I have no plans to ever have it produce a
single number, because I don't think that a single number can be useful
when comparing such things.
http://www.coker.com.au/bonnie++/
  1. Install bonnie++
yum install bonnie++
  1. Check then RAID 5 is OK
df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda2              19G  3.6G   14G  21% /
/dev/md0              903G  200M  856G   1% /raid
/dev/sda4             102G  188M   96G   1% /data
tmpfs                 974M     0  974M   0% /dev/shm
mdadm --detail /dev/md0
/dev/md0:
Version : 00.90.03
Creation Time : Wed Jul 30 17:50:39 2008
Raid Level : raid5
Array Size : 976767488 (931.52 GiB 1000.21 GB)
Used Dev Size : 488383744 (465.76 GiB 500.10 GB)
Raid Devices : 3
Total Devices : 3
Preferred Minor : 0
Persistence : Superblock is persistent
Update Time : Wed Jul 30 18:02:27 2008
State : clean
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 3
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 256K
UUID : a9823e1e:58e4f5de:23c55600:f6709b82
Events : 0.134
Number   Major   Minor   RaidDevice State
0       8       17        0      active sync   /dev/sdb1
1       8       33        1      active sync   /dev/sdc1
2       8       49        2      active sync   /dev/sdd1
  1. Execute test of RAID5 ext3 with bonnie++

Using Bonnie++ for filesystem performance benchmarking

mkdir /raid/foo; chown nobody:nobody /raid/foo
bonnie++ -d /raid/foo -u nobody -n 256:4k:256k:256
Version  1.03       ------Sequential Output------ --Sequential Input- --Random-
-Per Chr- --Block-- -Rewrite- -Per Chr- --Block-- --Seeks--
Machine        Size K/sec %CP K/sec %CP K/sec %CP K/sec %CP K/sec %CP  /sec %CP
server-ss.czech. 4G 41856  66 57606  25 38283  14 67527  94 198204  28 398.6   2
------Sequential Create------ --------Random Create--------
-Create-- --Read--- -Delete-- -Create-- --Read--- -Delete--
files:max            /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP
256:4:0  8734  92  1842   4  1099   9  6375  67  1539   3   751   6
server-ss.czech.sun.com,4G,41856,66,57606,25,38283,14,67527,94,198204,28,398.6,2,
256:4:0,8734,92,1842,4,1099,9,6375,67,1539,3,751,6
  1. Install IOzone
yum install iozone
  1. Execute test with IOzone

IOzone for filesystem performance benchmarking

How To Measure Linux Filesystem I/O Performance With iozone

To generate output in excel binary format use:

iozone -Rab RAID5ext3.wks -s 4G -y 256 -q 4G -f /raid/io.dat
iozone -a -s 4G -y 4 -q 256 -f /raid/io.dat >|/tmp/iozone-stdout.txt
cat /tmp/iozone-stdout.txt
Iozone: Performance Test of File I/O
Version $Revision: 3.239 $
Compiled for 64 bit mode.
Build: linux
Contributors:William Norcott, Don Capps, Isom Crawford, Kirby Collins
Al Slater, Scott Rhine, Mike Wisner, Ken Goss
Steve Landherr, Brad Smith, Mark Kelly, Dr. Alain CYR,
Randy Dunlap, Mark Montague, Dan Million,
Jean-Marc Zucconi, Jeff Blomberg,
Erik Habbinga, Kris Strecker, Walter Wong.
Run began: Thu Jul 31 17:10:14 2008
Auto Mode
File size set to 4194304 KB
Using Minimum Record Size 4 KB
Using Maximum Record Size 256 KB
Command line used: iozone -a -s 4G -y 4 -q 256 -f /raid/io.dat
Output is in Kbytes/sec
Time Resolution = 0.000001 seconds.
Processor cache size set to 1024 Kbytes.
Processor cache line size set to 32 bytes.
File stride size set to 17 * record size.
random  random    bkwd  record  stride
KB  reclen   write rewrite    read    reread    read   write    read rewrite    read   fwrite frewrite   fread  freread
4194304       4   60210   61877   215016   215843     987     931    8037  742912    7677    60715    62531  213825   213460
4194304       8   60570   63541   213657   212932    1952    1770   12253 1005675   11420    61302    62816  213138   211290
4194304      16   60952   63155   213161   212619    3798    3324   15581 1507697   13581    61176    62513  214020   213729
4194304      32   60547   62658   213689   211876    7215    5855   19657 1800489   11169    60159    63051  212422   214734
4194304      64   60230   62995   213664   214559   13358    9620   23528 1260652   11023    60116    61720  212040   215193
4194304     128   60929   62967   211966   214767   23275   14478   26869 1285143   16332    61014    62238  212320   213551
4194304     256   60251   63022   212565   213736   39098   19322   34277 1244309   27430    60891    61653  210492   214187
iozone -a -s 4G -y 256 -q 8m -f /raid/io.dat >|/tmp/iozone-stdout.txt
cat /tmp/iozone-stdout.txt
Iozone: Performance Test of File I/O
Version $Revision: 3.239 $
Compiled for 64 bit mode.
Build: linux
Contributors:William Norcott, Don Capps, Isom Crawford, Kirby Collins
Al Slater, Scott Rhine, Mike Wisner, Ken Goss
Steve Landherr, Brad Smith, Mark Kelly, Dr. Alain CYR,
Randy Dunlap, Mark Montague, Dan Million,
Jean-Marc Zucconi, Jeff Blomberg,
Erik Habbinga, Kris Strecker, Walter Wong.
Run began: Fri Aug  1 08:23:08 2008
Auto Mode
File size set to 4194304 KB
Using Minimum Record Size 256 KB
Using Maximum Record Size 8192 KB
Command line used: iozone -a -s 4G -y 256 -q 8m -f /raid/io.dat
Output is in Kbytes/sec
Time Resolution = 0.000001 seconds.
Processor cache size set to 1024 Kbytes.
Processor cache line size set to 32 bytes.
File stride size set to 17 * record size.
random  random    bkwd  record  stride
KB  reclen   write rewrite    read    reread    read   write    read rewrite    read   fwrite frewrite   fread  freread
4194304     256   60643   63406   213593   211083   39437   19715   33517 1412109   26784    60709    61450  212631   214188
4194304     512   60859   63353   214445   213950   64272   25091   48946 1152862   45028    60582    62286  210917   213828
4194304    1024   61011   62359   211738   214167   98398   35338   71577  856781   67229    60863    62613  211406   213374
4194304    2048   61400   63038   211187   212609  128051   42329  108703  955015  128652    59598    62650  215075   215384
4194304    4096   60803   62255   212795   213868  173390   49645  138978  999215  160949    60615    61732  214925   212312
4194304    8192   61116   63147   214041   213492  213732   52960  161412 1077049  186152    59844    61994  213266   212136

Remove RADI5 from system

  1. Umount /raid
 umount /raid
  1. Remove /raid mount from /etc/fstab
 vim /etc/fstab
  1. Stop MD0
 mdadm -v -S /dev/md0
  1. Clean RAID devices
 dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb count=1 bs=521
dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdc count=1 bs=521
dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdd count=1 bs=521
sync

Prepare first disk forOpenSolaris Install

  1. Change with fdisk type of first partition to Solaris bf
  1. Install grub for Fedora into /dev/sda2
grub
grub> root (hd0,1)
root (hd0,1)
Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83
grub> setup (hd0,1)
setup (hd0,1)
Checking if "/boot/grub/stage1" exists... yes
Checking if "/boot/grub/stage2" exists... yes
Checking if "/boot/grub/e2fs_stage1_5" exists... yes
Running "embed /boot/grub/e2fs_stage1_5 (hd0,1)"... failed (this is not fatal)
Running "embed /boot/grub/e2fs_stage1_5 (hd0,1)"... failed (this is not fatal)
Running "install /boot/grub/stage1 (hd0,1) /boot/grub/stage2 p /boot/grub/grub.conf "... succeeded
Done.
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1 Comment »

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